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2 kopecks 1795 (Russia) - struck over a 2 paras / 3 kopecks Sadagura coin
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bronze, outer circle made by small segments
Obverse: Saint George on horse, impaling a dragon with his lance, ribbon with Cyrillic inscription DVE · KOPEIKI meaning TWO KOPECKS, al left and at right M M, letters showing that the coin was struck at the Moskow Mint

from the former representation of the Sadagura coin it can be observed the square with the sides made of torsades and Cyrillic inscription [2] PARA (PARA underlined with two close lines 3 KOPIEKI
Reverse: crowned monogram of empress Catherine II (E II I - Ecaterina II Imperatritsa) and year 17 95 inside laurel and palm wreath, outer circle made by small segments

from the former representation of the Sadagura coin it can be observed the two inclined oval shields, in the left shield the aurochs head of Moldavia, in the right one the Walachian eagle with Patriarchal cross in its beak, the princely crown above the shields; a small fragment - MON - from the semicircular inscription (in Russian) MON. MOLD: I VALOSK. also remained

The pictures of the coin above are present on Romanian coins through the kind permission of „GORNY & MOSCH Giessener Münzhandlung GmbH”.


Below is another example of a 2 kopecks 1795 that keeps traces of the original 2 paras / 3 kopecks Sadagura. The coin appeared in Lithuania.

Obverse: as above

from the former representation of the Sadagura coin it can be observed the square with the sides made of torsades
Reverse: as above

from the former representation of the Sadagura coin it can be observed a fragment - MON MOLD - from the semicircular inscription (in Russian) MON. MOLD: I VALOSK.

Sadagura Coins that Reached the Russian Empire

Some of the coins struck at Sadagura reached Russia, despite the interdiction given by Czarist authorities. With respect to their face value, in Russia the coins were not heavy enough. The fact originated of course in the mistreatment applied to Romanians, who were both deceived and forced into accepting coinage that featured flagrant discrepancy between face value and intrinsic value, but nevertheless made the Sadagura coins attractive to illegitimate speculators inside inner Russia. There, the coins were fished out from circulation in large quantities. Coins summing almost 116 poods in weight were withdrawn from circulation (1 pood = 16.38 kilograms). Coins that entered the Russian Empire by contraband were also confiscated.

These Sadagura coins were used in 1795 as blanks for striking Russian "regular" coins (with the monogram of empress Catherine II of one side and with Saint George on horse on the other side). Theoretically, the mass of a 2 paras / 3 kopecks coin was 22.7 grams, a bit heavier than the theoretical mass of the Russian 2 kopecks coin - 20.4 grams. In reality the Sadagura coins were made even lighter than the weight imposed by the privilege, so the 2 paras / 3 kopecks coins were fit to be used as blanks for striking Russian 2 kopecks coins, and 1 para / 3 dengas - for striking Russian 1 kopeck coins. The restrike operation was done at Moscow, at the Red Mint (Krasnyi Monetnyi Dvor). For the sake of time and expenses, the edge of these kopecks from 1795 was not modified, thus remaining the original one of the Sadagura coins. The coins of 1795 weak strikes over Sadagura coins kept much or less from the details of the original piece, and are nowadays very demanded by the collectors.


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