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fake shillings from Suceava mint
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~15 mm, ~0.5 g, bronze
Obverse Inside inner liear circle coat of arms of the town of Riga (two crossed keys, a cross atop); outer pearl circle and legend:
S[OLIDU]S CIVI[RIG53]
(SOLIDUS CIVITATIS RIGENSIS)
~14 mm, ~0.5 g, bronze
Obverse Inside inner liear circle coat of arms of the town of Riga (two crossed keys, a cross atop); outer pearl circle and legend:
SOL[IDUS CIVI RIG5]8
Reverse Outer pearl circle and inner linear circle, monogram C, a crown atop, inside letter C coat of arms of the Swedish Vasa family (vertical bunch of fasciae or maybe? a wheat sheaf) andegend:
CH[R]ISTINA·D[·G·R·S]
(CHRISTINA DEO GRATIA REGINA SVEDIAE)

Reverse Outer pearl circle and inner linear circle, monogram CG, letter G being placed inside letter C, a crown atop and legenda:
C[AROLUS GVSTAV DGRS]

These medieval fake coins were struck in the Moldavian mint of Suceava and are present on Romanian coins thanks to Mr Adrian Popovici.

The coins correspond to quotes 892 and 991 in Monede și bancnote românești.

Inside the Suceava mint (called bănărie), reestablished under prince Eustratie Dabija, the issues started in 1662 and went on up to about 1680. During this period only Moldavian copper shillings were struck, commonly named șalăi by the general folk and solidi in Latin and forgeries of several European currencies.

Numerous imitations of Swedish, Polish and Prussian shillings were counterfeited there under the reign of Eustratie Dabija as well as under the rules of his followers, Gheorghe Duca and Iliaș Alexandru. It seems that the forging activity is linked to the name of Titus Livius Boratini, concessionary of the Cracowian mint. The counterfeit mintage of Swedish shillings show that these were quite well spread in Moldavia. Maybe the Swedish coins flushed on the European market along with the Tirty Years' War.

Best represented in Moldavian forgery are the Christina Swedish shillings, knowing over one hundred variants.

The fakes bear the coat of arms of the Latvian city of Riga, "the famous fortress on land and see", as called by Moldavian chronicler Ion Neculce. At the time the town was under Swedish rule, seized from the Poles. Around 1710 the fortress was captured by the Russians.


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